03
Haikou Eco-Heritage Trail
ANCIENT VILLAGES IN TANGSHAN AREA
The ruins along the trail were once a village in the Yangshan area. The dilapidated stone walls overgrown with vines are traces of the past that have not been swept away, intriguing every visitor with lingering memories of the old days.
This village was called Yangru Village and originated 300 years ago. Its villagers, most of whom carried the surname Wang, migrated from the neighboring Ruchen Village during the time of Emperor Qianlong in the Qing Dynasty. The villagers had lived here in prosperity for over 100 years, until the end of the Qing Dynasty and the beginning of the Republic, when war broke out and disrupted their peaceful life. To avoid being subjugated by the Japanese invaders, the villagers gradually moved back to Ruchen Village. In the 1940s, as the last villager, Wang Yehui moved back, Yangru Village was completely abandoned.
The location and arrangement of most of the ancient villages were based around the needs of villagers, and took into consideration of factors such as water sources, cultivated land and the local climate. Villagers made systematic floor plans, such as well-spaced gates, enclosure walls, courtyards, and public activity areas.
Diverse in architectural style, simple in decoration, the most common structures in the ancient villages of Yanshan included dwellings, ancestral halls, temples, village gates, enclosure walls, memorial arches, as well as other domestic and defense installations, which covered a diverse spectrum of Chinese architectural styles. Compared to the luxurious residences of Jin merchants and the sophisticated houses of South Anhui, the structures here were relatively small, and without spacious halls, extensive gardens, or gorgeous decorations. The carved beams and painted rafters were usually made of lava, showing a simple appearance that blended well into the surrounding environment to create an air of harmony.
A strong cultural heritage permeated all aspects of life in the ancient villages of Yangshan. These villages have been kept in their original state, ensuring that visitors can gain a strong understanding of the cultural and lifestyle that used to exist here, including the customs, rituals, religions and entertainment. These dwellings reflect people’s daily lives and folk culture in a way that is neither exaggerated nor pretentious. Many of the villagers’ traditional activities are now part of the area’s rich cultural heritage.
SPECIAL FEATURES
Gant Alocasia - Elephant Eat Taro
villages in Yangshan
Stone Mill
Evidence of Lava Flow
SPECIAL FEATURES
Gant Alocasia - Elephant Eat Taro
villages in Yangshan
Stone Mill
Evidence of Lava Flow